Kensal Stoves – Bank Holiday Savings

Kensal Stoves - Bank Holiday Savings

Choose Kensal Stoves this Autumn

This August bank holiday sees some heavy price reductions on all of our Kensal Stoves. With autumn fast approaching and with that comes the cold mornings, darker evenings and that 10 more minutes under the duvet feeling. As the weather starts to change, more people are starting to think about buying a wood burning or multi fuel stove. We look into why you should consider a Kensal Stove, and thanks to reduced pricing, why now is the best time to buy one.

Kensal Stoves have been in the market place for a number of years and are often compared against the Stovax Stockton range of stoves, due to their similarities in size, output and design. Kensal Stoves offer a traditional range of wood burning and multi fuel stoves ranging from 3kW – 11kW and manufacture both room heaters and high output boiler models. Designed specifically to be more in keeping in a rural home, these stoves offer good heating efficiency for their size. Chunky door hinges, a solid robust handle, single and double door options with removable window crosses and canopied models give a wide choice of designs in a singular range.

Kensal Stoves Range Overview
left to right: Kensal 20, Kensal 33, Kensal 40, Kensal 60

Why should you consider Kensal Stoves?

To look at these stoves, you would be forgiven for thinking that it looks very similar to many other models in the market. So why should you buy a Kensal over its competitors? Well to start with Kensal Stoves are built in Europe by Stovax who are the largest UK supplier of wood and multi fuel stoves. Each stove is constructed from strong pre-rolled steel and feature cast-iron doors for added strength and longevity. Inside the stove you have durable thick clay firebricks lining the sides of the stove, and a cast-iron rear firebrick supporting the steel baffle plate. The Kensal range also has three air supplies, primary air is located on a slider on the door and lets air in directly to the base of the fire. Secondary is operated by a lever above the door which brings cool room air in and washes the glass with it before mixing with the primary air and fed into the fire – more commonly known as airwash. Finally, there is a tertiary air supply that is drawn in from underneath the back of the stove and channelled up through the rear firebrick so it is warmed prior to entering the firebox at the top, ensuring a cleanburn.

Most models are available as either a dedicated woodburner or as a multi fuel model. Woodburning Kensal Stoves have firebricks running to the base and are designed for fires to be lit directly onto the base of the stove. Multi fuel models featured an elevated grate system which lifts the fuel off the base of the stove allowing for air to be supplied underneath the grate for an optimum burn of smokeless coal and space for an ashpan to collect the falling ashes, making cleaning quick and easy. Multi fuel models also have an external riddling arm fitted to them as standard meaning that using the tool provided you can riddle or shake the grate whilst the stove is burning without having to open the door. The Kensal 20 and 33 models are available with an optional DEFRA kit, which allows for the stoves to be installed into a smoke control zone.

Traditional Kensal 60 Multifuel Stove
Kensal 60 in an inglenook style fireplace with fitted window crosses

How do Kensal Stoves compare in the market?

So now we have analysed what you get inside a Kensal, but why should you buy one? After all there are hundreds of stoves available in the market today, why should you choose a Kensal? Let’s take a look at a couple of models:

Kensal 20 Multifuel Stove
Kensal 20 Multifuel Stove

Kensal 20 Multifuel Stove

  • 3.75kW output
  • 86% efficiency rating
  • DEFRA Approved (with optional kit)
  • Steel body with cast-iron door
  • 5″ top or rear flue connection
  • Traditional design
  • Multifuel with external ridiling
  • 5 Year warranty available
  • £499 including VAT

The closest equivalent model to the Kensal 20 is the Hunter Hawk 3 Multifuel, which has all the same characteristics except a much lower efficiency rating of 76% and a price tag of £529. The Stovax Stockton 3 is very similar, but with some differences internally and carries a price tag of £699. So, at £499 the Kensal is really good value for money.

Kensal 33 Wood Burning Stove
Kensal 33 Wood Burning Stove

 Kensal 33 Woodburner

  • 4.9kW output
  • 80% efficiency rating
  • DEFRA Approved (with optional kit)
  • Steel body with cast-iron door
  • 5″ top or rear flue connection
  • Traditional design
  • 5 Year warranty available
  • £599 including VAT

Again, the closest equivalent model to the Kensal 33 wood is the Hunter Herald 4 Wood, which has similar characteristics and dimensions with a slightly lower efficiency rating of 78% and a price tag of £639. The Stovax Stockton 5 and Yeoman Exmoor stoves are very similar with some internal differences, but they both carry price tags of £829 and £849 respectively. At £599 the Kensal is really good value for money. Another stove to mention would be the ESSE 1 Wood which is cheaper at £447 and does hit many of the points mentioned, but if you compare the two, you can feel where the extra money has gone, especially when you open the door and adjust the air controls.

Kensal 33 with low canopy
Kensal 33 Wood Stove with fitted low canopy

So as with everything in life, you get what you pay for, but with Kensal stoves, you will be pleasantly surprised at how much you get for your money. Prices on a Kensal Stoves have been dropped from today ahead of the bank holiday weekend and will remain throughout the upcoming heating season while stocks last. You can see the full range of Kensal Stoves on their dedicated brand page.

*Prices on all models correct at time of publication.

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